Syntax Description

This page describes the complete BlogText syntax (which is mostly based on the Creole 1.0 syntax). Of course, this page is entierly written in BlogText syntax.

Note: How a certain code is rendered depends on the WordPress Theme you’re using. Results may look different on your WordPress Theme than they look here.

Paragraphs and Line Breaks

Paragraphs are created simply by separating them by a blank line, like so:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr, sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore magna aliquyam erat, sed diam voluptua. At vero eos et accusam et justo duo dolores et ea rebum. Stet clita kasd gubergren, no sea takimata sanctus est Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet.

Simple line breaks are respected. For example this code:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr,
sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore

will look like this (which is exactly like the original code):

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consetetur sadipscing elitr,
sed diam nonumy eirmod tempor invidunt ut labore et dolore

Basic Inline Formatting

Type Syntax Result
Bold this is **bold** text this is bold text
Italics this is //italics// text this is italics text
Mixed Bold and Italics this is //italics text containg some **bold** text// this is italics text containing some bold text
Underlined this is __underlined__ text this is underlined text
Strike through this is ~~striked-through~~ text this is striked-through text
Super- and Sub Script this is ,,sub,, and this is ^^super^^ scripted text this is sub and this is super scripted text
Inline Code this is a ##code_variable##, `this too`, and this is {{{another snippet}}} this is a code_variable, this too, and this is another snippet

For more information on inserting code snippets, see Insertings Code Snippets below.

Limitations:

  • You can’t start an indention with a bold word using the **...** syntax. Use <b>...</b> instead.
  • You can’t start a new line with a bold word using the **...** syntax directly after an unordered list.
  • You can’t start a line with a ## code snippet. Simply use one of the other syntaxes (ie. `...` or {{{...}}}).

BlogText provides some constructs for creating links.

External links are links to other website. The easiest way is to simply write an URL in your text, like so:

This is a text containing an URL to http://www.mayastudios.com.
(I like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal_(Game) )

This results in:

This is a text containing an URL to www.mayastudios.com.
(I like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal_(Game))

Note that there is a space between the right round bracket and “.com”. This prevents the bracket from being included in the URL. Without this space the URL would be www.mayastudios.com). Note, however, that a trailing fullstop, comma, semicolon, or colon won’t be part of the URL.

Note also that the URLs are shortend, though this can be disabled in the BlogText settings.

Often you want to create a link with a custom name. To do this use a code like this:

This is a [[http://www.mayastudios.com|link with name]].

This will look like this:

This is a link with name.

Internal links are links within the blog. In most cases this will be links to other posts or page. You can do this like this (where “about” is the post’s or page’s name and “About Page” is the link name):

Link to the [[about|About Page]]

This will render as:

Link to the About Page

The name ("Slug") in "Quick Edit"
The name ("Slug") in "Quick Edit"
The name while editing a page or post
The name while editing a page or post

Note: The post’s or page’s name usually resemble somehow the post’s or page’s title. The name is displayed in the Posts or Pages overview when clicking on “Quick Edit” (called “Slug”). It is also displayed with a light yellow highlight while editing the post or page at the top of the edit page – as can be seen on the screenshots.

You can also link to specific section in a page or post by providing a so called “anchor name”. The anchor name is simply append to the page’s name separated by a hash sign (#). If you want to specify a link to a section on the same page, simply just specify the hash sign and the anchor name. For example this code:

This is a link to [[hello-world#example-section|another post’s section]] and this to the section [[#internal_links]] on the same page.

would render as:

This is a link to another post’s section and this to the section Internal Links on the same page.

Note that when you don’t specify a name for a link to a section on the same page, the section’s title is automatically chosen.

For more information about how to find out a section’s anchor name and how to specify it, see Anchor names for sections.

Besides linking to other posts or pages you can also link to some special pages. The following table gives an overview over all possibilities:

Type Syntax Result
Categories [[category:Announcements]] Announcements
Tags [[tag:example]] example

We’re planning to also implement links to archives (year archive, month archive) as well as links (aka blogroll or bookmarks).

Links to Media/Attachments

WordPress makes it quite easy to upload images and other files (like PDF files) to your blog. To upload new files, use the quick links located just above the toolbar while editing a post or page.

Wordpress Media Quicklinks
Quicklinks for images and file upload

Note: The images in the section are based on WordPress 3.1. By the time you read this, the interface may have changed but should basically work the same way.

After clicking on one of the four buttons (it doesn’t matter which one), you can select the file to upload. In our example we’ve uploaded the file gpl.pdf. In the upload form

  1. add the information you want (eg. a caption is recommended),
  2. then click the button called “File URL” (only sometimes necessary),
  3. and then click the “Insert Into Post” button.

Uploading a file with the media browser
Uploading a file with the media browser

The will insert the following code into your editor:

[[file:gpl-3.0.pdf]]

This link will be rendered as:

GNU General Public License v3

The name for the link will be the caption you provided in the upload form, or the file name if you didn’t specify a caption. Of course, you can also specify the name manually like this: [[file:gpl-3.0.pdf|My custom caption]].

Note: The button “Post URL” will change link from a link directly to the file to a link to description page for the attachment. If we had clicked this button (before clicking “Insert Into Post”), the code would have look like [[gpl-3-0]] and would have rendered as GNU General Public License v3 instead. It’s also recommended to install a plugin like Attachment Page Comment Control to disable comments and trackbacks for those attachment pages, if you use them.

The almost all links you’ve seen so far were created by enclosing them into square brackets ([[...]]), like this:

[[hello-world]] or [[file:gpl-3.0.pdf]]

These kind of links are called “Interlinks”. This section briefly explains the general concept behind Interlinks.

One of the first things you may have notices is that Interlinks come with and without a prefix. A prefix is the word that is written before the color (:), like file or category. Examples:

  • Without prefix: [[hello-world]] or [[about]]
  • With prefix: [[category:Announcements]] or [[file:gpl-3.0.pdf]]

This prefix obviously defines which kind of link you want to specify. The text after the colon (:) specifies the thing you want to link to.

The next thing you may have noticed is that you can specify a link’s name by adding a pipe (|) followed by the link name to the Interlink.

For example, [[file:gpl-3.0.pdf|a link to the GPLv3]] will be rendered as a link to the GPLv3.

If you don’t specify a name after the pipe (|), the link target will be used as name.

For example, [[file:gpl-3.0.pdf|]] will render as gpl-3.0.pdf (whereas [[file:gpl-3.0.pdf]] – without trailing pipe – will render as GNU General Public License v3).

The text after a pipe is called a parameter. An Interlink can have multiple parameters. Parameters are separated by a pipe.

For example, [[wiki:en|Portal (video game)|Portal]] – which is a custom interlink – will be rendered as Portal. This interlink has three parameters: en, Portal (video game), and Portal.

So, to be more precise, the link name is always determined by the last parameter.

For example, [[wiki:en|Portal (video game)]] will be rendered as Portal (video game) while [[wiki:en|Portal (video game)|]] will be rendered as en.

There are, however, a few exceptions to this rule where the last parameter is not used as name – most prominently in conjunction with images.

One last thing: If you specify a link within a word, the part of the word that comes after the link will be part of the link, whereas the part before the link won’t be. For example:

Link to [[syntax]]s and Test[[syntax]] (with "[[syntax]]").

will render as:

Link to Syntax Descriptions and TestSyntax Description (with “Syntax Description“).

Images

Inserting an image into a post or page works very similar to the process described in Links to Media/Attachments. There are some small differences though.

Alignment and size when inserting an image
Alignment and size when inserting an image

The most important difference is that the form now allows you to specify the image’s alignment and its size. Assume we’ve uploaded an image called nature.jpg. By selecting “Center” as alignment, “Medium” as size, and clicking on the “File URL” button, inserting this image will create this code:

[[image:nature.jpg|center|medium|link=source]]

This will be rendered as:

Nature in Bavaria

As you can see, the words medium (size) and center (alignment) appear as Interlink parameters along with link=source. The parameter link= defines what happens when the user clicks on the image. link=source means “link to the source image” – which is the full-size version of the smaller version displayed here.

If you want to display a caption for an image, you can either specify the caption in the media browser and add the caption parameter or specify the caption directly in the interlink:

Either use [[image:myimage.jpg|caption]] or [[image:myimage.jpg|My special caption]].

Note: The latter case (ie. displaying a caption when one is specified directly in the interlink) can be disabled in the settings. If disabled, a caption will only be disabled when the parameter caption is specified.

A caption for the image above will display as:

Beautiful nature
Beautiful nature

Note that you can specify the image parameters in any order. For example [[image:nature.jpg|link=source|medium|center]] will have the same result as the code above. For a full list of all available parameters and their values, see Image Parameter Reference.

One more thing: Inserting a small image (possibly without alignment) with a link to its source image is a special case. In this case BlogText assumes you want to insert a so called “thumbnail” (which is basically a small image with a link to its source image). The code in this case (with alignment “None”) would look like this:

[[image:nature.jpg|thumb]]

Nature in Bavaria

This code would be rendered as this.

So, the parameter thumb is equivalent to small|link=source. Note that the image is right aligned automatically. The alignment can be changed in BlogText’s settings.

Image Size

As mentioned before, the size of an image is specified as parameter to the image Interlink. The size can be specified like so:

  • Symbolic size: [[...|small|...], [[...|medium|...], [[...|large|...] (or [[...|big|...] which is an alias for large).
  • Explicit size: [[...|250px|...]

The “symbolic sizes” can be configured in the Media settings (under “Settings” –> “Media”).

Note, however, that WordPress themes can specify their content width (by using the global variable $content_width). This width is respected by BlogText. So, when you use a “symbolic size”, it’ll only be as wide as the theme’s content width specifies. For example, if large is defined as “1024 pixels wide” but the theme’s content width is only 600 pixels wide, adding an image with [[...|large|...]] will result in an image that is 600 pixels wide. (Note that setting $content_width to zero indicates that the content widht is not specified.)

Image Parameter Reference

The section describes all parameters and their values for images ([[image:...]]).

Type Parameter(s) Notes
Alignment left, center, right  
Size as word small, medium, large, big when no size is specified, the image will be displayed in full size (unless thumb is specified); the actual size of these names can be specified in the Media settings in WordPress’ admin interface.
Width in pixels 123px specifies the width of the image in pixels; can’t be used together with a “size word” (eg. small).
Link to source image link=source  
Link to internal page link=hello-world  
Link with prefix link=category:Announcements You can used any available Interlink. It’s no problem, if the interlink requires one than one parameter. All parameters not recognized by the image Interlink will automatically be passed as parameter to the link Interlink.
Link to external page link=http://www.mayastudios.de  
Display caption caption Displays the image’s caption below the image. The caption can either be specified in the image’s media browser form or by the last parameter of the image Interlink (which takes precendence).
Hide caption nocaption Hides the image caption, if it would otherwise be displayed.
Thumbnail thumb Equals link=source|small

Notes:

  • If the last parameter is not recognized by the image Interlink, it’ll be used as caption for the image. This will also overwrite any caption that may have been specified in the image’s media browser form.
  • You can’t overwrite the link for an image that has the thumb parameter. It’ll always link to the source image.

If you use links to a certain website more often, you can create an Interlink prefix for this website yourself. In the BlogText settings you have a textfield to define Interlink prefixes together with their URL pattern.

For example, say you often link to Wikipedia articles. Of course, you could simply use the full link in your texts like this:

[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal_%28video_game%29|Portal]]

Quite lengthy. You can now define your own Interlink – with prefix wiki – like this:

wiki = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/$1

Now with this new prefix you can specify the exactly same link like this:

[[wiki:Portal (video game)|Portal]] which would render as Portal

If you have a blog and write in multiple language – say English and German – you could define your wiki prefix like this instead:

wiki = http://$1.wikipedia.org/wiki/$2

With this Interlink you can define Wikipedia links for any available language. For example:

[[wiki:en|Portal (video game)|Portal in English]] and [[wiki:de|Portal (Computerspiel)|Portal auf Deutsch]]

which then would render as:

Portal in English and Portal auf Deutsch

As you can see, each placeholder in the prefix definition (ie. $1, $2, …) is substituted with the Interlink parameter with the same “position number” (ie. $1 is replaced by the first parameter, $2 by the second, and so forth). This means, however, that the order of the parameters is not arbitrary (unlike images for which parameters can be specified in any order).

Also custom interlinks have the advantage to let you specify a custom icon for this particular link type (via CSS) – like it is done for the Wikipedia links here.

Sidenote: If this isn’t sufficient for your needs, it’s theoretically possible to write PHP class to implement more complex Interlink handlers. However, since BlogText is still in beta, the interface you need to implement may not yet be stable and may change in the future. The interface should be simple enough though so that you can adapt changes without any big difficulty.

Lists

With BlogText you can specify two types of lists: ordered and unordered lists. Ordered lists use the number sign (#) and unordered lists use the multiply sign (*). For example:

 * item 1
 * item 2
 * item 3

 # item 1
 # item 2
 # item 3

would render as:

  • item 1
  • item 2
  • item 3

  1. item 1
  2. item 2
  3. item 3

Nested sublists can be created by combining the characters of the desired list types.

Example Rendered as
* item 1
** item 1.1
* item 2
  • item 1

    • item 1.1
  • item 2
# item 1
## item 1.1
# item 2
  1. item 1

    1. item 1.1
  2. item 2
* item 1
*# item 1.1
* item 2
  • item 1

    1. item 1.1
  • item 2

It’s also possible to create paragraphs in list items, like this:

* This is a line in the first paragraph.

  This is a line in the second paragraph.
* This is another item.

This would render as:

  • This is a line in the first paragraph.

    This is a line in the second paragraph.

  • This is another item.

Note that the second paragraph needs to be indented – like in the example. Otherwise it’ll not associated with the list item.

Limitations: You can’t insert tables created with the BlogText syntax in list items. If you really need to have a table in a list item, you need to create a table with HTML tags (ie. <table>, <tr>, <th>, and <td>).

You can also continue a list item after you’ve inserted a sub-list. Simply append a caret (^) to the list item definition, like this:

# this is item number 1
#* it contains a sublist with
#* two items
#^ here goes more text for item number 1
# and here comes item number 2

This would render as:

  1. this is item number 1

    • it contains a sublist with
    • two items

    here goes more text for item number 1

  2. and here comes item number 2

Finally you can restart an (ordered) list by appending an exclamation mark (!) to the first list item definition. For example:

# list 1, item 1
# list 1, item 2

#! list 2, item 1
# list 2, item 2

which would render as:

  1. list 1, item 1
  2. list 1, item 2

  1. list 2, item 1
  2. list 2, item 2

Note: If you’re looking for definition lists, see Definitions (Definition Lists).

Headings

If your post or page has gotten a little bit longer, it’s a good advise to split the post or page into sections. Sections are created by inserting headings into the post or page. Headings are created like this:

= Level 1 (largest) =
== Level 2 ==
=== Level 3 ===
==== Level 4 ====
===== Level 5 =====
====== Level 6 ======

The number of equal sign (=) at the beginning determine the heading level. The equal sign at the end are optional and also their number can be chosen arbitrarily. So also the following is possible:

== Level 2a
== Level 2b ==========================

Note: You can always use level 1 heading (single = sign) for your top-level heading. The HTML heading level produced from the top-level heading can be set in the settings (eg. = test = can produce <h2>test</h2>).

Table of Contents (TOC)

If you have created a longer post or page with a lot of heading (like this page), you may want to add a table of contents (TOC) to the post or page. You can do this by simply adding the following line to your code (preferrably at the beginning):

[[[TOC]]]

This will generate a TOC for you at the specified location.

Anchor names for sections

Normally BlogText will generate anchor names for each heading automatically depending on the heading’s text. This name is usually visible in the browser’s status bar (at the bottom of the browser window) when hovering with mouse over the paragraph sign (&para;) that appears when you move the mouse over a heading.

Hovering over a section's permalink
Hovering over a section’s permalink
A section's anchor name displayed in the browser's status bar while hovering over the section's permalink.
A section’s anchor name displayed in the browser’s status bar while hovering over the section’s permalink.

However, if you want to link to a certain section, you should provide your own anchor name. This way the anchor name won’t change if the heading’s text changes. A custom anchor name for a heading is specified like this (with “my-custom-anchor” being the anchor’s name):

== My Heading == #my-custom-anchor

Note that you need to separate the anchor name from the heading’s text by at least one equal sign (as shown in the example).

For your anchor name, you shouldn’t use fancy characters like spaces, tabulators, or umlauts. It’s safe to use English letters (ie. a – z and A – Z), digits (0 – 9), underscores (_), and dashes (-). In fact, a valid HTML (4) id must only use the previously mentioned characters and must start with a letter.

Recommendation: To separate words in your ids, use dashes (-) instead of underscores (_). This has some subtle advantages for SEO and editors as the dash is usually interpreted as punctuation whereas the underscore is not.

Insertings Code Snippets

BlogText provides a convenient method to add code snippets to your post or page.

Note: If you’re just looking for a way to prevent BlogText from interpreting some text, you should use a no-parse section.

Inline code fragments have already been mentioned in Basic Inline Formatting but are repeated here for completeness. There are three forms available: using ##, `, and {{{ ... }}}. For example:

An example ##code fragment##, a `second one`, and {{{another one}}} here.

This would render as:

An example code fragment, second one, and another one here.

Limitation: You can’t use ## ... ## as first thing on a line as this will be considered an ordered list. Use {{{ ... }}} or ` ... ` instead.

More often, however, you will want to use code blocks. You can specify a code block like this:

{{{
#include 
 
int main()
{
    std::cout &lt;&lt; &quot;Hello, world!\n&quot;;
    return 0;
}
}}}

This will render like this:

#include 
 
int main()
{
    std::cout &lt;&lt; &quot;Hello, world!\n&quot;;
    return 0;
}

Since this is a C++ code snippet, we'd like to have some syntax highlighting and line numbering. This can easily be achieved by specifying the name of the programming language ("C" in this case) and the number of the first code line. With these changes, the example now looks like this:

{{{ lang=c++ line=4
#include 
 
int main()
{
    std::cout &lt;&lt; &quot;Hello, world!\n&quot;;
    return 0;
}
}}}

And this will render like this:

4
5
6
7
8
9
10
#include 
 
int main()
{
    std::cout &lt;&lt; &quot;Hello, world!\n&quot;;
    return 0;
}
Window to lookup all supported programming languages.
Window to lookup all supported programming languages.

BlogText uses GeSHi for syntax highlighting. A full list of all supported programming languages is accessible through the button "lang lookup" in the WordPress editor.

You can also highlight some lines. To do this, use the highlight attribute and specify the line numbers (as comma-separated list). For example:

{{{ lang=c# highlight=6,14 line=3
#region codinghorror.com
class Program : Object
{
    static int _I = 1;

    /// <summary>
    /// The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
    /// THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS OVER THE LAZY DOG
    /// </summary>
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Uri Illegal1Uri = new Uri("http://packmyboxwith/jugs.html?q=five-dozen&amp;t=liquor");
        Regex OperatorRegex = new Regex(@"\S#$", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);
    }
}
#endregion
}}}

will render as:

3
4
5
67
8
9
10
11
12
13
1415
16
17
18
#region codinghorror.com
class Program : Object
{
    static int _I = 1; 
    /// <summary>
    /// The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
    /// THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS OVER THE LAZY DOG
    /// </summary>
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Uri Illegal1Uri = new Uri("http://packmyboxwith/jugs.html?q=five-dozen&amp;t=liquor");        Regex OperatorRegex = new Regex(@"\S#$", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);
    }
}
#endregion

Notes:

  • You can also enable syntax highlighting for inline code snippets. For this, you need to use the curly braces syntax ({{{ ... }}}). For example this {{{ lang=php function do_something($my_var) }}} will render like this: function do_something($my_var).
  • You can also specify the language by the file extension associated with the language. Simply use a dot followed by the file extension. For example, this will result in Ada highlighting: {{{ lang=.adb ... }}}.

Tables

Since creating tables with HTML is quite lengthy and not that easy to read, BlogText provides easier syntax for specifying tables: a syntax for simple tables and one for more complex tables.

Limitations: You can’t specify BlogText lists in BlogText tables (since these tables don’t allow line breaks). If you need a list within a table, you need either to create a HTML list (with <ul>, <ol>, and <li> tags) or create an HTML table (with <table>, <tr>, <th>, and <td> tags). Code block will work however.

Simple Tables (Creole Syntax)

This syntax is only usable for very simple tables, although this might suffice in most cases. The simpliest form looks like this:

| Cell 1.1 | Cell 1.2 |
| Cell 2.1 | Cell 2.2 |

This will render as:

Cell 1.1 Cell 1.2
Cell 2.1 Cell 2.2

This table is just comprised of four table cells. It can be extended by adding column headings (using |=) and a table caption (using |+). With both syntax elements, the code now looks like this:

|=Heading Col 1 |=Heading Col 2 |
|Cell 1.1       |Cell 1.2       |
|Cell 2.1       |Cell 2.2       |
|+ This is an example table.

and renders as:

Heading Col 1 Heading Col 2
Cell 1.1 Cell 1.2
Cell 2.1 Cell 2.2

This is an example table.

That’s what you can do with this table syntax. If you want custom CSS styles for certain table cell, column-spanning, or row-spanning you need to use the syntax for complex tables.

Note: The trailing pipe characters (|) is optional. So is the alignment of the pipe characters. The last table example could also be written like this (yielding the same result):

|=Heading Col 1|=Heading Col 2
|Cell 1.1|Cell 1.2
|Cell 2.1|Cell 2.2
|+ This is an example table.

Complex Tables (Mediawiki Syntax)

This syntax allows for more complex tables that require for example custom CSS styles for certain table cell, column-spanning, or row-spanning. It’s based on the Mediawiki table syntax and is explained in greater detail there. Here we will only focus on the basics (which are partially copied from the Mediawiki help page).

A table written in the Mediawiki syntax can consist of the following elements:

{| table start
|+ table caption, optional; only between table start and first table row
|- table row, optional on first row — wiki engine assumes the first row
! table header cell, optional. Consecutive table header cells may be added on same line separated by double marks (!!) or start on new lines, each with its own single mark (!).
| table data cell, required! Consecutive table data cells may be added on same line separated by double marks (||) or start on new lines, each with its own single mark (|).
|} table end

For example the following code:

{|
! Item  !! Amount !! Cost
|-
|Orange || 10     || 7.00
|-
|Bread  || 4      || 3.00
|-
|Butter || 1      || 5.00
|-
!Total  ||        || 15.00
|}

will render as:

Item Amount Cost
Orange 10 7.00
Bread 4 3.00
Butter 1 5.00
Total 15.00

The code for the same table with one cell per line will look like this:

{|
! Item
! Amount
! Cost
|-
|Orange
|10
|7.00
|-
|Bread
|4
|3.00
|-
|Butter
|1
|5.00
|-
!Total
|
|15.00
|}

You can specify arbitrary HTML tag attributes (such as rowspan or colspan for row- and column-spanning) for each cell and for the complete table.

{| style="width: 400px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"
!colspan="6"|Shopping List
|-
|rowspan="2"|Bread &amp; Butter
|Pie
|Buns
|Danish
|colspan="2"|Croissant
|-
|Cheese
|colspan="2"|Ice cream
|Butter
|Yoghurt
|}

This will render as:

Shopping List
Bread & Butter Pie Buns Danish Croissant
Cheese Ice cream Butter Yoghurt

Using HTML in BlogText

You can use HTML freely within your BlogText code. For example you can enclose a certain section of your text in a <div> or <span> section to provide special CSS styles for this section:

This is **some <span style="background: red">special content</span> formatting**.

This will render as:

This is some special content formatting.

Miscellaneous Things

This section contains miscellaneous syntax constructs that don’t fit in any of the other sections and are less commonly used.

Block Quotation

>A block quotation (also known as a long quotation or extract) is a quotation in a written document, that set off from the main text as a paragraph, or block of text, and typically distinguished visually using indentation and a different typeface or smaller size quotation. (This is in contrast to a setting it off with quotation marks in a run-in quote.) Block quotations are used for the long quotation. The Chicago Manual of Style recommends using a block quotation when extracted text is 100 words or more, or at least eight lines.
>Source: Wikipedia

This was a block quation. Lines for a block quotation start with a &gt;. The code for the quotation above is:

&gt;A **block quotation** (also known as a **long quotation** or **extract**) is a quotation in a written document, that set off from the main text as a paragraph, or **block** of text, and typically distinguished visually using indentation and a different typeface or smaller size quotation. (This is in contrast to a setting it off with quotation marks in a //run-in quote//.) **Block quotations** are used for the long quotation. The Chicago Manual of Style recommends using a block quotation when extracted text is 100 words or more, or at least eight lines.
&gt;Source: [[wiki:en|Block quotation|Wikipedia]]

Indenting Text

To indent a piece of text, simple indent it by at least two spaces, like so:

This is some text.

  This is some indented text.

This text is no longer indented.

This will render as (horizontal lines were inserted to border the result):


This is some text.

This is some indented text.

This text is no longer indented.


Definitions (Definition Lists)

BlogText provides a simple syntax to define one or more terms. The simpliest version specifies the term and the definition on the same line – separated by a colon (:). For example:

; XML : eXtensible Markup Language
; HTML : Hypertext Markup Language

will render as:

XML
eXtensible Markup Language
HTML

Hypertext Markup Language

If you need to specify the term and the definition on separate lines — for example because the term is long or contains a colon (:) — you can use an alternative syntax. For example:

;! XML
;: eXtensible Markup Language

will render as:

XML

eXtensible Markup Language

You can also mix both syntaxes.

Horizontal Lines

Though it’s usually not recommended to use horizontal lines, you can insert them non the less. To specify a horizontal lines, write at least four dashes (-) in a separate line like so:

----

This will be rendered as:


Special Characters

You can use certain special characters in BlogText text. This section lists the most important ones:

Code Rendered as
--
&larr;
&rarr;

Note: Of couse all of HTML’s named entities are supported.

No-Parse Text

If you don’t want a certain portion of text to be interpreted as BlogText syntax, you define it as a no-parse text. A no-parse text starts with {{! and ends with !}}. For example:

{{! This text **won't be bold** printed. !}}

This will render as:

This text **won’t be bold** printed.

The difference to a code block is that this isn’t rendered with a monospaced font but with the blog’s regular font.

Note: A no-parse section won’t allow you by default to used HTML inside of it. If you really need to use HTML within a no-parse section, add a second exclamation mark to the opening marker (ie. {{!! instead of {{!). For example:

{{!!<code>&#037;&#037;</code>!}} vs. {{!<code>&#037;&#037;</code>!}}

will render as:

%% vs. <code>&#037;&#037;</code>

Comments

BlogText supports end-of-line comments in your text. Comments are just for the person editing a post or page. They won’t be visible in any way in the rendered page (not even in the HTML code). You can, for example, use comments to add todos to certain section.

To create a comment, simply write %%. Everything that comes after the %% on the same line will be completely ignored by BlogText. For example:

This is like very much. %% TODO: Not any more. Adjust this setence.